Player King: Early Modern Theatricality and the Playing of Power in William Shakespeare’s Henriad

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Player King: Early Modern Theatricality and the Playing of Power in William Shakespeare’s Henriad

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Title: Player King: Early Modern Theatricality and the Playing of Power in William Shakespeare’s Henriad
Author: Townsend, Emily
Advisor: Kramer, Joseph
Department: Haverford College. Dept. of English
Type: Thesis (B.A.)
Running Time: 230236 bytes88343 bytes
Issue Date: 2005
Abstract: This essay examines Shakespeare’s history plays as an exploration of the place of theatricality in politics. Over the course of two tetralogies, Shakespeare enters into the Early Modern theatrical discourse by presenting his audience with a series of monarchs who rise and fall according to their histrionic skill and interpretation of the role of King. Prince Hal easily emerges as the playwright’s champion, destined for success by the strength of his theatrical drive and his innate understanding that to succeed within the realm of political theatre, one must become a Player.
Subject: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Criticism and interpretation
Subject: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Characters -- Kings and rulers
Subject: Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616 -- Histories
Subject: Power (Philosophy) in literature
Subject: Politics and literature
Terms of Use: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10066/635

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Townsend, Emily. "Player King: Early Modern Theatricality and the Playing of Power in William Shakespeare’s Henriad". 2005. Available electronically from http://hdl.handle.net/10066/635.

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