A Question of Life, A Sentence of Death : Analysis of the Empowerment Discourse for HIV/AIDS in Guatemala City

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A Question of Life, A Sentence of Death : Analysis of the Empowerment Discourse for HIV/AIDS in Guatemala City

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dc.contributor.advisor Porter, Judith
dc.contributor.advisor Noonan-Ngwane, Zolani
dc.contributor.author Leitner-Laserna, Liliana en_US
dc.date.accessioned 2007-02-28T20:21:19Z
dc.date.available 2007-02-28T20:21:19Z
dc.date.issued 2006 en_US
dc.identifier.uri http://hdl.handle.net/10066/605
dc.description.abstract In this thesis, I examine the ways in which the term “empowerment” (empoderamiento) is conceptualized and utilized by various actors in the HIV/AIDS community in Guatemala City. My desire to explore this theme stems from the participant-observation I conducted in a Médecins Sans Frontiéres HIV/AIDS clinic from March-August 2004. In my thesis I analyze the various discourses emerging around this word, its evolution/development in different spheres and people, and its deployment and appropriation by various individuals. Utilizing interview data from fieldwork conducted in December 2005, I use two analytical methodologies to investigate the discourses that healthcare providers and patients present regarding the notion of “empowerment.” The first analysis uses a coding model both to characterize the nature of the discourses, uncovering trends between patients and providers, and to compare these discourses to the First World’s articulation of the word empowerment (using World Bank’s definition). The second analysis utilizes a case study of a patient/ provider to explore the complexities of adopting a First World discourse. Here I demonstrate that attempts to “localize” the concept of empowerment is limited to translating the word linguistically and to using local people to promote its use. I argue that attempts to promote First World discourses indeed fail to instill a true local empowerment because the underlying ideological presuppositions in the term “empowerment” leaves no room for local understandings. Such a pattern proves to be unsustainable and ineffective to promote true grassroots empowerment. Hence in this thesis I propose that the World Bank changes its current day definition of empowerment in order to frame development programs directly from local people’s epistemology. en_US
dc.description.sponsorship Haverford College. Dept. of Anthropology en_US
dc.format.extent 980030 bytes en_US
dc.format.extent 161271 bytes
dc.format.mimetype application/pdf en_US
dc.format.mimetype text/plain
dc.language.iso en_US en_US
dc.rights.uri http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
dc.subject.lcsh HIV infections -- Treatment -- Guatemala -- Guatemala
dc.subject.lcsh AIDS (Disease) -- Patients -- Services for -- Guatemala -- Guatemala
dc.subject.lcsh Language and languages -- Political aspects
dc.title A Question of Life, A Sentence of Death : Analysis of the Empowerment Discourse for HIV/AIDS in Guatemala City en_US
dc.type Thesis (B.A.) en_US


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