The Press Should be United: The relationship between the state and the press in early 20th century China

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The Press Should be United: The relationship between the state and the press in early 20th century China

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Title: The Press Should be United: The relationship between the state and the press in early 20th century China
Author: Wiedemann, Chris
Advisor: Jiang, Yonglin; Smith, Paul Jacov
Department: Haverford College Dept. of History
Type: Thesis (B.A.)
Issue Date: 2010
Abstract: The Chinese press is often the subject of foreign criticism: it is centrally controlled, offers no scope for dissenting opinion, and its monitors are quick to stamp out extra-governmental flows of information. My thesis is an attempt to answer the question of how, exactly, the press in China took on the shape that it did. I argue that, while propaganda and censorship have both been features of PRC press from its inception, the roots of China's particular press model lie in the late Qing and early Republican periods, when the world's longest surviving empire dissolved in less than a century. In many areas of society, the response to the fall of the Qing was an adaptation, whether intentional or subconscious, of traditional Chinese cultural mores and theories of statecraft--the imperial orthodox ideology of the court. I contend that the Chinese press was both representative of that adaption and fundamentally shaped by it. The press became the educative tool of a powerful central state.
Subject: Government and the press -- China
Subject: Press -- China -- History -- 20th century
Terms of Use: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10066/4942

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Wiedemann, Chris. "The Press Should be United: The relationship between the state and the press in early 20th century China". 2010. Available electronically from http://hdl.handle.net/10066/4942.

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