The Cognitive and Social Determinants of Bystander Intervention: Techniques to Increase Helping Behavior in Bullying Situations

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The Cognitive and Social Determinants of Bystander Intervention: Techniques to Increase Helping Behavior in Bullying Situations

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Title: The Cognitive and Social Determinants of Bystander Intervention: Techniques to Increase Helping Behavior in Bullying Situations
Author: Thomas, Amy
Advisor: Le, Benjamin
Department: Haverford College. Dept. of Psychology
Type: Thesis (B.A.)
Issue Date: 2010
Abstract: This paper examines the role of the bystander in bullying situations. Through a review of the theories and research on school bullying, it is argued that targeting bystanders is a more effective means of decreasing the prevalence of bullying. Researchers have observed the presence of bystanders in the majority of bullying situations. Additionally, studies have shown that most students maintain anti-bullying attitudes. The frequency of bystander interventions is quite low, however, and consequently the negative effects of bullying, to the bully, the victim and the bystander, remain substantial. Working from a theoretical grounding in prosocial development and models of bystander intervention, it is believed that a more multifaceted approach is necessary to ensure bystander intervention. Through the use of cognitive learning strategies in conjunction with social and behavioral reinforcements, it is argued that bystander intervention can be increased in bullying episodes.
Subject: Bullying -- Prevention
Subject: Bystander effect
Terms of Use: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10066/4921

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Thomas, Amy. "The Cognitive and Social Determinants of Bystander Intervention: Techniques to Increase Helping Behavior in Bullying Situations". 2010. Available electronically from http://hdl.handle.net/10066/4921.

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