Effects of Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Gender on Self-Defining Academic Memories

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Effects of Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Gender on Self-Defining Academic Memories

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Title: Effects of Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Gender on Self-Defining Academic Memories
Author: Karzon, Lindsay S.
Advisor: Lilgendahl, Jennifer L.
Department: Haverford College. Dept. of Psychology
Type: Thesis (B.A.)
Running Time: 266186 bytes1300 bytes
Issue Date: 2007
Abstract: This study examines students’ perceptions of academic successes and failures. Our study focuses on narrative identity exhibited through autobiographical reasoning in self-defining memories as well as implicit self theories or beliefs about the extent to which one believes intelligence is a fixed or malleable entity. In addition, two differing perspectives of gender differences are explored.
Subject: Academic achievement -- Psychological aspects
Subject: Academic achievement -- Sex differences
Subject: College students -- Psychology
Terms of Use: http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/
Permanent URL: http://hdl.handle.net/10066/1312

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Karzon, Lindsay S.. "Effects of Implicit Theories of Intelligence and Gender on Self-Defining Academic Memories". 2007. Available electronically from http://hdl.handle.net/10066/1312.

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http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/ Except where otherwise noted, this item's license is described as http://creativecommons.org/licenses/by-nc/3.0/us/